Tag Archives: wee care

Wee Care Gown Sew-Along

I’m going to do a SAGA Wee Care gown sew-along for all those that wish to participate. The Wee Care gowns are the tiny bishop gowns used at the hospitals as infant demise gowns. It’s a beautiful expression of love and caring for the precious little ones that don’t make it and the families are so appreciative. I make so many of these each year, and I thought it would be a nice way to share some of my tips and techniques.

I will be sharing how I put together this gown. I use the SAGA Wee Care gown pattern by Nancy Newell and I cut the gown out using the NO side seam method.

Download and print your pattern, gather your supplies and be sure to watch the YouTube video.

I’m providing links to the supplies that I use and recommend, though feel free to substitute if you have different preferences. Just click on the blue words and it will take you to the website.

Gingher Pocket (Kindergarten) Scissors

Mettler 60 wt. thread

Madeira Cotona or Aurafil 80 wt. thread

Point Pusher with Ball End

Imperial Batiste

Schmetz 70 Microtex Needle

Schmetz 110 Jeans Needle

Schmetz Double Hemstitch Needle

Long Tweezers

Sulky Fabri-Solvy

Water Soluble thread

I will be sharing videos of how to insert the sleeves, sew the bias band on as well as how to create an easy Madeira hem – with or without hemstitching. I particularly like this hem treatment to embellish a boy’s gown. Of course, the same techniques can be used on another project – Easter dresses, tea towels, quilts, etc. Lots of options! So, even if you aren’t creating a Wee Care gown, learn the technique and use it elsewhere. Of course, the tiny gowns are a great way to practice and perfect different techniques while blessing a family.

Join the fun and enjoy the process! Hopefully you’ll learn something new or different!

Keep on stitching!

Kathy

Disclosure: The recommended products contain affiliate links. If you purchase something through one of those links I may receive a small commission, so thank you for supporting me when you shop! These are my opinions and are not representative of the companies that create these products. These are the products I use and have gotten great results with. I would never recommend poor quality products.

Tiny Gowns and YouTube

This past week I’ve completed several tiny gown sets that will be donated to Caleb Ministry. This is such a wonderful ministry to those that have lost their babies. Even if you don’t sew, you can support this ministry through your financial gifts. I pray for the families that will receive these sets and that God will bring comfort in such a time of sadness.

Each set that I make consists of a gown, cap/bonnet, flannel blanket & a handkerchief.

This set uses the smocked pattern from SAGA. The cross design is from Sonia Showalter Designs and it stitches out beautifully every time, as do all of her embroidery designs. I don’t remember where the tiny footprints come from.

These sets use the pattern from Caleb ministry. Again, the embroidery designs are from Sonia Showalter Designs.

I especially enjoy making the little girl sets – I guess I love lace and pink! This is the SAGA pattern for the gown. The bonnet pattern is from Laurie Anderson and stitches up quickly. Again, the embroidery design is from Sonia Showalter (link with the first picture).

Again, this gown uses the SAGA pattern. This is one of my favorite embroidery designs from Sonia Showalter – what a precious Bible verse and so appropriate.

In addition to making all these sets, I have been working to learn how to make video tutorials. What a learning curve this has been! I’m certainly no expert, but I have learned a few things and have MANY more to learn. With the video, I also had to learn how to set up a YouTube channel. This morning I uploaded my first tutorial – Tiny French Seams tutorial. I hope to continue this learning adventure and will post more tutorials as I’m able to. Hopefully each will improve as I learn more.

So, that’s how I’ve been spending my time these cold and wet winter days! I hope you’ve enjoyed some special stitching as well.

Keep on stitching……

Kathy

MICRO-PREEMIE BUNTING PATTERN – for under 1 lb. babies

Today as I worked on a Wee Care gown, I realized that the micro-preemie bunting pattern and instructions that I’d previously shared was one that was lost. Therefore, I’m sharing it again so that anyone wanting to make these and donate to their local hospitals has access to the pattern.

This sweet little bunting has been designed as a burial bunting for micro preemie babies. It stitches up quickly and uses minimal amounts of fabric. Quilting the fabric gives it the necessary body. Small bits of lace or trim can be used for embellishment if desired. A little hand or machine embroidery can be done very quickly.

In the past, I used one of the bunting patterns that was shared online. While I was happy with the finished bunting, it was far too complicated (my opinion).

This bunting is designed to ensure that the baby is securely wrapped. It can be completed in a very short time and it is done completely by machine.

Fabric for the inside of the bunting should be flannel.  A variety of fabrics can be used for the outside fabric.  If pre-quilted fabric is used it eliminates the need to quilt the fabric.  Quilting cottons, broadcloth, satin, lightweight fleece, etc. all work well for the outside fabric of the bunting.

Small scraps of trims or lace can be used to decorate the front flaps of the bunting.  These would include ribbons, soutache braid, Swiss eyelet lace, Val lace, rickrack, etc.

Supplies:

  • 12″ x 15″ piece of fashion fabric
  • 12″ x 15″ piece of thin cotton batting *
  • 12″ x 15″ piece of batiste
  • 12″ x 15″ piece of flannel (lining)
  • 24″ of 1/4″ or 1/8″ ribbon
  • 12″ of lace or trim (optional)
  • thread
  • blue wash-out marker
  • ruler with 1″ grid marks

*alternately, 3 – 4 layers of flannel can be used instead of batting

Instructions:

Open the PDF pattern file in Adobe reader on a laptop or desktop computer.  Print the pattern. Ensure that the pattern has been printed to the correct size by checking the 1” box.  Printing should be done from a computer, not a phone or tablet. Cut out the 2 pattern pieces and tape together, matching the notch.  Printing 2 copies of the pattern and taping both together down the center will give the full pattern piece, which is helpful for aligning patterns with designs that need to be centered.

To mark the fashion fabric for quilting, fold the fabric in half lengthwise and finger crease.  Open the fabric up.  With a blue wash out marker, draw a line along the crease.  Fold the fashion fabric in half across the width and crease.  Open the fabric up and using a blue wash out marker, draw a line along the crease.  Using a ruler with a grid, mark additional lines at 1” intervals along both the length and the width of the fabric.

Place batiste with wrong side facing up.  Place the batting on top of the batiste, matching all cut edges and then place the fashion fabric, right side up, on top of the batting, aligning all cut edges.  Pin to secure.  Starting at the center line of the 15” L, stitch along the line from top to bottom.  Moving out from the center line, stitch remaining lines until all the lines have been stitched along the 15” length.  Repeat for the process for the 12” width to complete the quilting of the fashion fabric.  (For interest, the grid can also be stitched at 45º angles.)

Cut out the bunting pattern from the quilted fabric and another bunting from the flannel.  It works very well to print 2 copies of the pattern and tape them together in order to work with the full size pattern.

Tip – the pattern can be traced onto the quilted fabric and then straight stitch along the drawn line. This secures the 3 layers together and is easier to work with. Cut out the shape just outside the stitched lines.

Cut straight across the top of the bunting, leaving the “dip” section in the front uncut.

With a blue wash-out marker, mark the front “dip” section. This will be the dart that makes up the shape for the bunting hood. It is easier to sew the dart in first and then trim away the excess fabric. Mark the dot below the dip as well as the placement lines for the ribbons with a blue wash-out marker.

With right sides together, stitch the dart/seam for the hood of the bunting, stopping at the circle.  Repeat for flannel.  Trim away the excess fabric inside the dart. Do any embellishments desired at this point.

Cut the ribbons into 6” lengths and pin the ribbons to the quilted fabric at the placement lines.

With right sides together, pin the flannel to the quilted fabric all around the outside edges.  Stitch around the entire bunting, leaving a 2” opening between one set of ribbons. 

Trim seam allowance a little, clip curves and clip the corners at an angle, stopping before reaching the stitching line.

Pull bunting through the opening to get it right side out. Press. Edge-stitch around the entire bunting, closing up the 2” opening.

Remove blue wash out marker by spritzing or soaking in cold water for 5 minutes.

Fold up lower section, bring outside sections together and tie the ribbons into a bow.

These are so quick to make, it’s easy to finish several of them in a very short time. Be creative with little bits of trim.

I hope that this will inspire you to use up some of your smaller pieces of pretty fabric and create a sweet bunting! I am including the PDF file for the pattern for your use. Click on the link below to download.

Keep on stitching…….

Kathy

Ka