Tag Archives: pattern draft

French Pattern Review and Remake

If you read my last post about the knit nightgowns, you know that my friend sent me home with a French pattern that she was anxious for me to make.  So, that was my project for the day yesterday.

Over the weekend I spent time researching the dress pattern since I wasn’t at all familiar with the pattern line or this specific dress.  The pattern line is called C’est Dimanche and the pattern name is Roma.  Because my Norton security indicates that the website may not be “safe”, I have not gone there for any information or to see what else is available.  I’m notorious for getting viruses.  😳

Isn’t this the cutest dress!!!  The designer clearly has some fabulous design ideas.  Cuteness sells, and I think she’s sold quite a few!

Pinterest was my main source for research.  I like to see the fit of the dress on a real child since I know that sketches can be misleading.  The pictures on Pinterest weren’t encouraging – most looked to be ill-fitting and too long-waisted.  I also found a blog with a “tutorial”, which is obviously needed given the instructions it was really tragic, to say the least (bias cut on the straight, etc. – and it turned out as bad as you are imagining!!!).  I decided a muslin of the bodice was necessary before cutting into good fabric.

This pattern is so trendy and fun – I can certainly see the appeal.  The open neckline and the faux Peter pan collar are something that young moms really like!  True necklines and classic Peter pan collars are things that I continually hear young moms call “old-fashioned”, not to mention that they believe that the necklines are too tight.  Kids today aren’t used to the close fit of a true neckline, so I can see where they may be perceived as too tight.  Generational differences.  LOL!

Cutting out the muslin and then attempting to sew it proved to be more of a challenge than i anticipated!!!  The pattern was first offered only in French, but later an english version was offered, which is what my friend bought.  That said, the english version is most interesting.  LOL!   I have to wonder about the translation.  These are phrases that aren’t ones I’ve ever encountered in my many years of sewing.

The description leaves a lot to be desired and the diagram doesn’t really help.  LOL!  Thankfully, I don’t really need instructions.  Pity the seamstress that does need them!!!

There were several things about the muslin that I found to be strange.  After sewing the shoulder seams, I thought that they looked very oddly shaped.  What’s with that jut outwards at the shoulder seam?

Once I got the muslin going, I found other minor issues that were easily corrected.  The biggest problem that I found was the lack of directions regarding the seam at the back bodice – I couldn’t find any directions or diagrams for that.  I suspect that is the reason that there are no pictures on any fan blogs of the back of the dress.  The pattern markings are only in French.  You do cut the back lining shorter than the bodice lining at the back edge. I believe that the bodice is to wrap around to the back to make a facing, and then join to the lining.  However, I never found any instructions in the pattern that addressed the bodice back and I’m not sure how that happens after you stitch the entire neckline.  😳  Thankfully, it is only a muslin.  I marked the center back line and left the back unstitched.

Once the bodice was finished, I tried it on my victim.  The fit wasn’t stellar and the longer waistline just looked frumpy. I decided that rather than work with this pattern draft, I would take the idea and draft my own pattern from a bodice that I know fits.  I’m so glad that I did!

The pattern instructions leave out so many instructions – no interfacing is advised, no instructions to clip curves before turning, no under stitching, no stitching reinforcement at that sharp turn of the collar section (though a circle of iron-on interfacing is suggested as optional), etc.  I don’t know if the designer assumes that this is common knowledge, or if she’s  not familiar with these techniques.

My final assessment of the pattern is that the designer has a wonderful idea, but the pattern and instructions leave a LOT to be desired.  I wouldn’t recommend it, though she has a fan blog with many glowing reviews.

My dress is made from a lightweight print chambray.  I added piping to the armholes as well as the waistline.  I interfaced the faux collar to give it body and crispness and, of course, interfaced the facings in the back.

The original pattern has a gathered skirt and a waistline that is lower, more at the true waist. I don’t care for that look on little girls (most of the Pinterest pictures confirmed that), so I went with my usual raised waistline.  I thought that the style of the dress was very “Laverne and Shirley” (you have to be over 50 to be familiar with that reference), so I decided to put a circle skirt on the bodice.  I love the result!!!

I did choose to button all the way down the back, which isn’t my favorite for kids.  Next time I think I’ll do an invisible zipper, which I think will be a better choice.

I can’t wait to see this on Ella!  My mannequin is a professional fitting mannequin, but a size 5 and the dress is a size 7.  Not idea, but it’s the best I can do.  This dress is really for next spring/summer for Ella, but I’m sure that she will be able to wear it a little big for the remainder of the summer.  Now that I have the pattern drafted in Ella’s size, I may try another one with more of an heirloom twist.  We’ll see….

I think my next project will be a quick and easy dress for Eva’s doll.  She doesn’t like anything I sew for her 😂, but she’s all about new clothes for her doll.