Tag Archives: Free Wee Care

Quilted Micro-Preemie Bunting Pattern & Tutorial

The last several months I’ve been sewing some of the adorable micro-preemie buntings that I found as a free download on the internet.  It is adorable and very functional.  Our SAGA guild has already been able to provide one of these buntings to a family that lost their precious little girl.  Of course, that made me want to make more of these, so I proceeded to cut out and begin to sew 16 more.  I have all but 8 of them finished, many are duplicates, so I only included a photo of different fabrics..  They have taken a considerable amount of time.

While I love the pattern and the style, I fount it to be very tedious with all the fiddly parts of it – the extra blanket inside, a pillow, etc.  After making quite a few of these and having to hand sew on all those tiny ribbons, I was determined to come up with something that had the same look, but was easier to construct and my goal was to eliminate the hand sewing since it took hours to stitch on all the little ribbons!

I am quite pleased with the gown that I came up with and am thankful for the inspiration that came from the first pattern that I made so many of.  I have been able to complete 3 of these buntings in the same time that it takes me to complete one of the other ones.  It also uses less fabric & ribbon and requires no hand sewing.  So, I’m offering it as a free download to anyone that wants to make these. (fingers crossed that the PDF download works!)  I know that they are much appreciated by both the families as well as the hospitals.

Kathys Quilted Micro-Preemie Bunting

Quilted Micro Preemie Bunting – For Babies Less Than 1 lb.

This sweet little bunting has been designed as a burial bunting for micro preemie babies.  It stitches up quickly and uses minimal amounts of fabric.  Quilting the fabric gives it the necessary body.  Small bits of lace or trim can be used for embellishment if desired.  A little hand or machine embroidery can be done very quickly.

Fabric for the inside of the bunting should be flannel, though any soft and absorbent fabric can also be used.  A variety of fabrics can be used for the outside fabric.  If pre-quilted fabric is used it eliminates the need to quilt the fabric.  Quilting cottons, broadcloth, satin, piqué, etc. all work well for the outside fabric of the bunting.  A lightweight minky fabric or cotton chenille also work for the outside of the bunting.  If using either of these fabrics, I would recommend using flannel rather than batting for the inner layer.

Small scraps of trims or lace can be used to decorate the front flaps of the bunting.  These would include ribbons, soutache braid, Swiss eyelet lace, Val lace, rickrack, etc.

 Supplies:

12” W x 15” L piece of fashion fabric

12” W x 15” L piece of batting

12” W x 15” L piece of flannel

12” W x 15” L piece of batiste (optional)

24” of ¼” or 1/8” ribbon

12” of lace/trim (optional)

Thread to match

Blue wash out marker

Print the pattern. Ensure that the pattern has been printed to the correct size by checking the 1” box.  Printing should be done from a computer, not a phone or tablet.  Cut out the 2 pattern pieces and tape together, matching the notch.  Printing 2 copies of the pattern and taping both together will give the full pattern piece, which is helpful for aligning patterns on the fabric.

To mark the fashion fabric for quilting, start on one side of the fabric and using a gridded ruler, mark lines at 1” intervals along both the length and the width of the fabric. The grids can also be stitched at 45º angles for a different look.

Place batiste with wrong side facing up.  Place the batting on top of the batiste, matching all cut edges and then place the fashion fabric, right side up, on top of the batting, aligning all cut edges. Pin to secure.  Starting at the center line of the 15” L, stitch along the line from top to bottom.  Moving out from the center line, stitch remaining lines until all the lines have been stitched along the 15” length.  Repeat for the process for the 12” W to complete the quilting of the fashion fabric.

Using batiste as the backing for the quilted fabric is optional, but I found it much easier to have the batiste backing on the fabric for cutting out and sewing.

Cut out the bunting pattern from the quilted fabric and another from the flannel.

I found that  cutting the top of the pattern straight across and then marking the “v” shape between the 2 taped together pieces as well as marking the circle worked well.  It was easier to cut out the “v” afterwards by folding the fabric in half and then cutting along the drawn in line.

For some fabrics (particularly the satin, which frays easily) I traced around the pattern piece, then stitched the layers together and cut out just outside the stitching line.  Having a compacted edge made it easier to sew.

With right sides together, stitch the seam for the hood of the bunting, stitching around the curve and stopping at the circle.    

Do any embellishing at this point.

Cut the ribbons into 6” lengths and pin the ribbons to the quilted fabric.

With right sides together, pin the flannel to the quilted fabric all around the outside edges. Stitch around the entire bunting, leaving a 2” – 2-1/2″ opening between one set of ribbons.

Trim seam allowance a little and clip curves and clip into the right angle, right up to the stitching line.

Pull bunting through the opening to get it right side out.  Press.  Pin closed the 2″ opening.   Edgestitch around the entire bunting, closing up the 2” opening.  An edge stitching foot can make this process easier.

Remove blue wash out marker by spritzing or soaking in cold water for 5 minutes.

Fold up lower section, bring outside sections together and tie the ribbons into a bow.

Tie ribbon ends into knots or heat seal or use Fray Check to prevent the ribbons from fraying.

Embellishing ideas:

A bit of Swiss trim with an entredeux edge was stitched about 1″ away from the seam (so measure 1-1/4″ away from cut edge to apply).  Floss was run through the ribbon and then used again to stitch French knots in the flower centers.

Pink and yellow tiny rickrack were braided together to give just a little complimentary color to this bunting.

Val beading with pink ribbon was used to trim this bunting.  The next time I do this treatment, I think I will move it a little away from the seam allowance and I think it will look better.

Two different sized rickrack was used for this bunting.  The smaller stitched on top of the larger.  If you find it difficult to keep the trims in place prior to stitching, use a washable glue to glue down the trim.  Elmer’s washable glue can be used and then press dry for a quick dry.

I hope you’ll enjoy making these sweet little buntings for your local hospital!  Please feel free to share this post with your sewing group, SAGA guild, etc.

Happy stitching!

Kathy